In which certain things are crossed out

book blog
(and some social justice, fem and mental health)
basically because language and lit are my life this tends to be...

Undertaker by Patricia Smith

rachelmckibbens:

For Floyd Williams

When a bullet enters the brain, the head explodes.
I can think of no softer warning for the mothers
who sit doubled before my desk,
knotting their smooth brown hands,
and begging, fix my boy, fix my boy.
Here’s his high school picture.
And the smirking, mildly mustachioed…

I’m not so sure if it’s inappropriate of me to reblog this, as I am white, but I thought it was beautifully written and relevant (and the poet who posted this is a woc). Please tell me if it’s problematic. 

readcolor:

readCOLOR is a global online visual literacy project which supports and celebrates readers of color engaging with works created by authors of color.readCOLOR serves as a bridge which facilitates the visibility of authors of color in communities across the world, while allowing readers of color to become aware of the incredible abundance of literature which reflects and represents them. through such visibility, readCOLOR seeks to assist in the preservation of the many languages spoken by communities of color, promote literacy, and become an interactive literary resource which brings authors and readers of color from around the world, together.it is our hope that readCOLOR will help to remove the barriers that artists and audiences of color face in accessing one another, and ease the difficulty in finding representation in literature.readCOLOR is created and curated by a circle of creatives which include: yrsa daley-ward. desiree venn frederic. l.a. winter. tapiwa mugabe. and nayyirah waheed.participating is simple + easy.
individualssubmit photo of yourself with book. or book alone.with caption including:
your name/age (optional | all ages welcomed)
city or country (optional)title. author. language of book. genre of book.why this book/author?#ireadCOLORbecause __________. (please answer)book clubssubmit photo of yourself. and/or book club. with book.
with caption including:
your name/age  (optional | all ages welcomed)
city or country (optional)title. author. language of book. genre of book.why you started/joined the book club?why your club selected this book/author?#wereadCOLORbecause__________. (please answer)authorssubmit photo of yourself with your book. or another authors’ book. or book alone.
with caption including:
your name/age (age is optional)
city or countrytitle. author. language of book. genre of book.why this book/author?#ireadCOLORbecause _________.(answer if another authors’ book) #iwriteCOLORbecause_________. (answer if your book own)send submissions to ireadCOLOR@gmail.comsubmissions are subject to approval.
chosen submissions will be featured on readCOLOR’s social media platforms.
instagram: readCOLORtumblr: readcolor@gmail.comtwitter: @readCOLORemail: ireadcolor@gmail.com
#hashtagsreaders are invited to discuss utilizing hashtags:#ireadCOLORbecause, #readCOLORauthors are invited to discuss utilizing hashtags:#iwriteCOLORbecause, #writeCOLOR, #ireadCOLORbecause, #readCOLORreadCOLOR and share !

readcolor:

readCOLOR is a global online visual literacy project which supports and celebrates readers of color engaging with works created by authors of color.

readCOLOR serves as a bridge which facilitates the visibility of authors of color in communities across the world, while allowing readers of color to become aware of the incredible abundance of literature which reflects and represents them. through such visibility, readCOLOR seeks to assist in the preservation of the many languages spoken by communities of color, promote literacy, and become an interactive literary resource which brings authors and readers of color from around the world, together.

it is our hope that readCOLOR will help to remove the barriers that artists and audiences of color face in accessing one another, and ease the difficulty in finding representation in literature.

readCOLOR is created and curated by a circle of creatives which include: yrsa daley-ward. desiree venn frederic. l.a. winter. tapiwa mugabe. and nayyirah waheed.



participating is simple + easy.



individuals

submit photo of yourself with book. or book alone.

with caption including:


your name/age (optional | all ages welcomed)


city or country (optional)
title. author. language of book. genre of book.
why this book/author?
#ireadCOLORbecause __________. (please answer)


book clubs

submit photo of yourself. and/or book club. with book.

with caption including:


your name/age  (optional | all ages welcomed)

city or country (optional)
title. author. language of book. genre of book.
why you started/joined the book club?
why your club selected this book/author?
#wereadCOLORbecause__________. (please answer)


authors

submit photo of yourself with your book. or another authors’ book. or book alone.

with caption including:


your name/age (age is optional)


city or country
title. author. language of book. genre of book.
why this book/author?
#ireadCOLORbecause _________.(answer if another authors’ book) #iwriteCOLORbecause_________. (answer if your book own)


send submissions to ireadCOLOR@gmail.com

submissions are subject to approval.


chosen submissions will be featured on readCOLOR’s social media platforms.


instagram: readCOLOR
tumblr: readcolor@gmail.com
twitter: @readCOLOR
email: ireadcolor@gmail.com



#hashtags

readers are invited to discuss utilizing hashtags:

#ireadCOLORbecause, #readCOLOR

authors are invited to discuss utilizing hashtags:

#iwriteCOLORbecause, #writeCOLOR, #ireadCOLORbecause, #readCOLOR






readCOLOR and share !

(via teachingliteracy)

fuckyeahlavernecox:

Just received my copy of I Am Jazz! Found a quote by Laverne in it… :) 

I Am Jazz is the story of a transgender child based on the real-life experience of Jazz Jennings, who has become a spokesperson for trans kids everywhere.

(via claudiaboleyn)

queerpunkhamlet:

recoveringsjw:

sidneyia:

god-senpai:

queerpunkhamlet:

cis people aren’t allowed to edit my papers anymore

"WHAAATT? I HAVE TO EXPLAIN MY WORK??? IN MY OWN PAPER??? WHAT THE FUUUCK??"

It’s not my job to educate you, teacher. 

I’m betting one hundred bucks that this is a comment about a really badly written essay and not someone being actively transphobic.

well, you’re about to owe me one hundred bucks.
this is not the first time i mentioned privilege in the paper. or cisgender. this paper was written on my personal experiences with being trans, and the difficulties i’ve faced because of it, and the difficulties that cisgender people with otherwise comparable lives have not faced.
the terms privilege and cisgender had both been thoroughly elaborated on in this paper.
this paper was written for a women’s studies class, on gender analysis, in which both privilege and cisgender privilege in particular had been explained, elaborated upon, and discussed by the professor.
the comment was not by the professor, it was by a cis classmate during a peer review.
the words cisgender and privilege are both in scare quotes (in case you can’t google that or don’t know what it means or want to deny their existence, scare quotes is when you put a word or phrase in quotation marks to make it seem less real — the textual version of sarcastically making air quotes with your fingers)
another edit, by the same editor, involved asking me what my birth name was. i’m sure you don’t need to be told that that’s transphobic.
i spoke to the professor about this edit, and he agreed with me that the comment (and the way it was phrased) was out of line. in fact, he thought it was so out of line that he led a workshop for the class on how not to be disrespectful assholes to trans people (say, by asking for their birth name, or telling them they’re wrong or oversensitive about transphobia).
i got a 99% on the essay — WITHOUT changing anything the edit asked for.
the professor liked my essay so much that he asked to keep it as an EXAMPLE for future classes
bonus: if your reaction to seeing gross transphobic things is “well it’s probably the trans person’s fault”, then you’re gross and transphobic and i hope you don’t know any trans people IRL for their sake

queerpunkhamlet:

recoveringsjw:

sidneyia:

god-senpai:

queerpunkhamlet:

cis people aren’t allowed to edit my papers anymore

"WHAAATT? I HAVE TO EXPLAIN MY WORK??? IN MY OWN PAPER??? WHAT THE FUUUCK??"

It’s not my job to educate you, teacher.

I’m betting one hundred bucks that this is a comment about a really badly written essay and not someone being actively transphobic.

well, you’re about to owe me one hundred bucks.

  1. this is not the first time i mentioned privilege in the paper. or cisgender. this paper was written on my personal experiences with being trans, and the difficulties i’ve faced because of it, and the difficulties that cisgender people with otherwise comparable lives have not faced.
  2. the terms privilege and cisgender had both been thoroughly elaborated on in this paper.
  3. this paper was written for a women’s studies class, on gender analysis, in which both privilege and cisgender privilege in particular had been explained, elaborated upon, and discussed by the professor.
  4. the comment was not by the professor, it was by a cis classmate during a peer review.
  5. the words cisgender and privilege are both in scare quotes (in case you can’t google that or don’t know what it means or want to deny their existence, scare quotes is when you put a word or phrase in quotation marks to make it seem less real — the textual version of sarcastically making air quotes with your fingers)
  6. another edit, by the same editor, involved asking me what my birth name was. i’m sure you don’t need to be told that that’s transphobic.
  7. i spoke to the professor about this edit, and he agreed with me that the comment (and the way it was phrased) was out of line. in fact, he thought it was so out of line that he led a workshop for the class on how not to be disrespectful assholes to trans people (say, by asking for their birth name, or telling them they’re wrong or oversensitive about transphobia).
  8. i got a 99% on the essay — WITHOUT changing anything the edit asked for.
  9. the professor liked my essay so much that he asked to keep it as an EXAMPLE for future classes

bonus: if your reaction to seeing gross transphobic things is “well it’s probably the trans person’s fault”, then you’re gross and transphobic and i hope you don’t know any trans people IRL for their sake

(via nonbinaryanders)

Anonymous said: Shakespeare was queer? I thought he only had affairs with ladies. What dudes did he get it on with?

swanjolras:

OH U SWEET SUMMER CHILD

so remember those sonnets, you know, about one hundred and twenty-six of them, the whole thing about “shall i compare thee to a summer’s day”

written to a hot male earl, dude

in 1640 some asshole named john literally had to change all the pronouns in those 126 sonnets because they were super fuckin queer and he was not comfy with how super fuckin queer they were

also, like, casual elizabethan bisexuality? christopher “they who love not tobacco and boys are fools” marlowe? the venetian “tit bridge”, where prostitutes were commanded by official decree to stand around topless to entice men who were bangin’ too many dudes, because there were so many gay men it was becoming a legitimate social problem?

welcome to the wonderful world of “literally everyone in the past was queer”, friend, enjoy your stay